Dating industry jobs

The contentious issue of the moment — pitting one of the three biggest companies, True.com, against its major rivals — is whether online dating services can enhance their clients' safety by conducting criminal background screenings of would-be daters.

Last month, New Jersey became the first state to enact a law requiring the sites to disclose whether they perform background checks.

Come and work in an environment that encourages your growth by investing in conferences and workshops and always encouraging you to learn new things!

As Valentine's Day approaches, all is not lovey-dovey in the high-stakes online dating industry.

Services that do conduct screenings must disclose that fact and say whether they allow people with criminal convictions to use the site.

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"is disappointed New Jersey has enacted a flawed and unconstitutional law and we will explore opportunities to challenge it," a company statement said."If we were to clean up, there's hordes of off-line singles who'd come online to find their soul mate." The pitch appeals to women like Jayne Hitchcock of York, Maine, who was victimized by three years of online harassment and cyberstalking in late '90s after someone assumed her identity and sent sexually explicit messages.When Hitchcock later decided to try online dating, she turned to Critics say the type of screening envisioned by the law — checking for a particular name in databases of criminal convictions — has inherent flaws: users could give fake names, and many dangerous people may not be in the databases.Methods used in more probing background checks — such as fingerprint scans and research into employment records and Social Security numbers — are not required by the law.

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